Jewelboxing

A simple disc drive makes us all publishers and producers. Off-the-shelf packaging, however, belies the illusion. When I first began delivering photography to my clients on discs, I sent the CDs in nondescript, store-bought plastic cases. It looked awful. Then my search for a customizable wrapper that would project a business image, rather than one of a guy with a camera, led me to Jewelboxing.

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Designers, filmmakers, musicians, photographers and DIY DJs can all use this system to make their discs look less homemade, more slick. The idea is simple: You purchase a bulk quantity (anywhere from 20 to 150) of Music Sized (standards) CD cases or Movie Sized (kings) DVD cases, and download precise templates in whichever major design software is your preference; design your case, booklet and even a label to adhere directly to the disc; print the designs out; tear along perforations; assemble. There you have it.

The rounded-corner cases look and feel substantial, and you can even insert ball bearings, small wooden dowels (see Impactist photo) or other decorative objects into the hollow spine. Playlists, credits and notes all find their home in a neat, customizable folding booklet that slides in underneath the cover. Jewelboxes are a lot more expensive than standard cases, but they go a long way toward making a small business or project appear bigger, undeniably professional.

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Field Notes fans should already be familiar with Coudal Partners, the creative brains behind Jewelboxing. You can seek design inspiration from others’ Jewelboxing designs here.

-- Elon Schoenholz  

Jewelboxing
$98 (60-pack) Standards
$220 (100-pack) Kings

Manufactured by and available from Coudal Partners