FINDING TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS

Cheap paperback novels average one typographical error for every ten pages. — Joe Applegate, typo hunter as reported by Fred T. Shuster, Associated Press, Los Angeles, California

 



 

ALEX’S RULES OF PORTRAITURE

Your portraits won’t look so gimpy if you check to be sure the eyes are on a line half-way between the top of the head and the chin, the inside corners of the eyes are one eye-width apart, the nose is almost halfway between the eyes and chin, the nose is as wide as the distance between the eyes, the corners of the mouth fall directly below the pupils of the eyes, the top of the ears are on eye level, and the bottom of the ears come between the bottom of the nose and the mouth. — Alex Stewart, Atlanta, Georgia

 



 

INTERVIEWING SOMEONE

If someone you’re interviewing makes the same point more than twice, it’s the most important thing to him, and a crucial clue to his personality. — Robert Kanigel, writer and editor, Baltimore, Maryland

 



 

HAVING YOUR CAR FIXED

Any time a mechanic starts a conversation by telling you how lucky you are that you brought your car in when you did, plan on spending at least $100. — Carl Frandsen, Trumansburg, New York

 



 

FINDING A PLACE TO PITCH YOUR TENT

Farmers are three times more likely than rural nonfarmers and 10 times more likely than suburban people to let you pitch your tent on their land. And you should know better than to ask city people. — Geanne Toma, massage therapist, Lebanon, New Hampshire

 



 

RUNNING A DAIRY

The average useful life of a dairy cow is five to seven years. — Chris Dahl, dairy farmer

 



 

PAPERING A WALL

When papering an average wall with a print or striped wallpaper, expect to lose at least one foot of paper per strip to make them match. — Johnnie Putnam, WIND radio, Chicago, Illinois

 



 

PLAYING POKER

Don’t enter a poker game unless you have 60 times the betting limit in your pocket. When you have doubled this amount, it is time to quit for the day. — John Scarne, gambling authority

 



 

SELLING CARS

A well-run car dealership will make from 1 to 2 percent on sales. — Scott Parker, data specialist, Beaumont, Texas