ANTIQUE RULE OF THREE

Don’t buy a piece of antique furniture if you can find three things wrong with it. — Adam Perl, antique dealer

 



 

CHOOSING A CANOE PADDLE

To check a canoe paddle for size, stand it on the ground in front of you. The handle should come to the height of your chin if you plan to paddle from the bow of the canoe; it should come to the height of your eye if you plan to paddle from the stern. — Peter van Berkum, Kittery Point, Maine

 



 

BUYING A NEW CAR

The best time to but a new car is the last day of the month because the sales staff want their monthly reports to look good and are more likely to bargain. You can increase your chances of getting a good deal by choosing the youngest salesperson on the floor. — Scott Parker, data specialist, Beaumont, Texas

 



 

BUYING A TENT

A tent with a slanted door means rain on the floor. — Alan R. Reno, Watertown, New York

 



 

RUNNING A DAIRY

A cow starts milking when it is two years old. It won’t start making you any money until its second lactation, when it is three and a half years old. — Chris Dahl, dairy farmer

 



 

FALLING OUT OF SHAPE

It takes twice as long to fall out of shape as it took to get into shape. — Ned Frederick, writer, Exeter, New Hampshire

 



 

LUNCHING WITH YOUR HELP

You have to have lunch with your cleaning lady once a month in order to keep her caring about your possessions. — Laura H. Holmberg, attorney, Ithaca, New York

 



 

DECIDING WHEN TO BLUFF

There are three factors involved in successful bluffing. (1) Your opponent: It is easier to bluff a strong player than a weak one. (2) Your position in the game: It is easier to bluff a big loser than a big winner. (3) Money: The bigger the stakes, the easier it is to bluff. Don’t bluff unless you have at least two of these factors on your side. — Edwin Silberstang, games expert

 



 

BUYING BUSINESS EQUIPMENT

To get turn-key quality business equipment instead of a do-it-yourself job, count on paying 14 percent more. — Steven Kropper, telecommunications consultant, Watertown, Massachusetts

 



 

DESIGNING ADVERTISEMENTS

Five times as many people read the headline as read the rest of an ad. — David Ogilvy, advertising expert, The Ogilvy and Mather Agency