Schrade Key Chain Pry Tool

I got this as a birthday gift and it’s been on my keychain since. It’s about 3.25 inches long and about an inch at its widest. It has several tools including: pry tool, bottle opener, seat belt cutter, screw-driver, and a wrench driver that accommodates a variety of bolt/nut diameters.

It has a hole for attaching to your keychain, but also comes with a lanyard if you don’t want to attach directly to your keyring.

The seat belt/cord cutter is recessed so you shouldn’t cut yourself unless you really try, but it sometimes can get caught on your pocket on the way in. Also, if you have young kids, be careful if they play with this as their fingers may be small enough to fit in the blade area.

The thing I like most about it is its weight. It is made of titanium and weighs 0.5 oz., about the weight of 3 quarters! I have had several other keychain tools, but they were all either too heavy or too bulky. With the pry tool on my keychain, I hardly notice the difference in my pocket.

-- Stuart Peterson  

Schrade Key Chain Pry Tool
$23

Available from Amazon



Last day to get Cool Tools Catalog for Christmas

A box of copies of Kevin’s book, Cool Tools: A Catalog of Possibilities, has been sitting across the street from Amazon’s processing center for the past couple of weeks. The Amazon listing for the book showed it as being unavailable, and we were getting email from Cool Tools readers wondering if copies would become available in time for Christmas.

The good news is that Amazon now has the copies and they are ready to ship! However, today is the last day you can order it and have it arrive in the US by December 24. If you want a copy, you need it order it now. The deadline expires in a matter of hours.

 

 

 

Cool Tools: A Catalog of Possibilities
$27

Available from Amazon



 

Brett Doar, Multidisciplinary Artist [Cool Tools Show #16]

Subscribe to the Cool Tools Podcast on iTunes |RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page

Brett Doar, an artist/maker renowned for his Rube Goldberg machines, shows us some little tools that can make a big impact. He cites both a penny and the humble paperclip as his two most valuable tools. He also recommends an inexpensive 3D printer for making custom components.

Brett’s Website

Links to Brett’s work:

Baby Mobile of Death

Mobile de Piccinati

rotating thing toy

Survey of Work up to 2006

 

DaVinci 3D printer $500

“…that the filament comes in cartridges instead of just a spool…the cartridges are 28$ for a 600 grams of filament where if you’re doing something like Makerbot or something it’s 50$ for a pound…It’s got a heated bed. It’s all enclosed. It’s a crazy value.”

 

 

Clamp-tite clamp maker

“It’s a wonderful thing to use… Anything that you need to stick together, you can make a little clamp for this. All you need is some semi-flexible wire.”

 

Penny on a String ~$.01

“…because I was making this stuff out of wire…I would mangle my fingers…but if you’re using a penny or something you can use it almost like a thimble. A penny is just about the right size for my finger. It basically fits right at the end of my finger and you just put the string around your neck and you’ve got this tool around your neck.”

Paper Clips $7.50

“One of the reasons that paperclips appealed to me at first was because they were all a set length and so you can use them as a form of measurement. You can unfold it and you basically know that you can connect them end to end and make a wheel and then everything is based on the same sort of unit of measurement…I’ve built things that are three feet wide and a couple of feet tall that are made almost entirely out of paperclips.”

 



 

Cool Tools 2014 Holiday Gift Guide: Gifts for $10 or less

In the weeks leading up to the holidays, we’ll be presenting a series of gift suggestions selected from the pages of Cool Tools: A Catalog of Possibilities (which itself makes a great gift). This week: great gifts for under $10.


Giottos Rocket Blaster ($10)
“This rubber rocket doesn’t provide as much pressure as Dust-Off, but it exhales a forceful-enough blast for dusting photo/electronic gear, and standing upright on its base sidelines as playful desk dressing/stress-relief toy.”


Coghlan’s 12-in-1 Scissors ($8)
“A silly looking and cheap tool that is surprisingly useful. It will cut fairly heavy material, has a bottle opener, screwdriver, and will come apart so you can use it as an awl or hole punch in an emergency.

Photon Microlight II.jpeg
Photon Microlight II ($9)
 “This is a very handy little light that is small enough to carry around in your pocket on a keychain. It weighs only 4.8-grams and the LED “bulb” is very bright for its size, more than adequate for finding your way around in a dark spot, reading a map, finding key holes, etc, with a simple thumb press on the button”


Fantastic Ice Scraper ($4)
 “It’s been my go-to ice removal device. I now keep one in the kitchen for cleaning counter tops, glass tables, stove tops and any other hard surface that needs an occasional scrape down. I also keep one in the garage for general scraping and cleaning.”

rowan
Rowan LT-36 Clip-On Tuner ($10) Update! in the comments, Slideguy says the Rowan is a better $10 tuner than the Snark: “There are lots of good headstock tuners on the market now, and the the Snark has a big drawback besides short battery life. The display is too dim to be used in daylight. Even Snark recognized the problem and came out with an improved display on their SN-8. But the Rowin LT-36 has a bright display that changes colors when you get your tuning just right. It’s smaller, lighter, and has longer battery life. I sell guitars for a living, and always have one of these in my pocket to tweak an instrument before I hand it to a customer.”

Want more $10 gift ideas? Take a look at our 2013 Low Cost Gift Guide

 



 

Co-founder of Quantified Self, Gary Wolf [Cool Tools Show #15]

Subscribe to the Cool Tools Podcast on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 | See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page

In this week’s episode of the Cool Tools Show, Gary Wolf, Co-founder of Quantified Self, shows us how his favorite Quantified Self inspired apps help him stay consistent, motivated and aware about his most important daily routines. If you’re struggling to keep your healthy habits in check, this week’s episode may help you diagnose where those dips in motivation are coming from.

Quantified Self

Gary’s Twitter

Show Notes:

Equanimity: Meditation Timer & Tracker by Robin Barooah $5

“It keeps a record of your meditation sessions, when you stop, when you start. It gives you a field to take notes and gives you the ability to reflect on the patterns in your practice, including CSV export of all your meditation data in a table. A few years into using it I ran a little analysis of what my practice really looked like and I learned so much from doing that. For instance, I learned that I had an average time without a break between days of about nine days.”

750 words by Buster Benson Free

“It’s premised on the theory that doing some free writing in the morning is very good for you, for your creativity. It can reduce stress by keeping you in touch with the random thoughts and random voices that are in your head and discharging some of the internal narrative and it’s also really relaxing. In a sense it resembles a meditation practice — it releases creativity and reduces stress.”

Mushrooms Demystified by David Arora $30

“It’s unlike any other guide I’ve ever encountered. On almost on every page it contains a story of a personal encounter with the mushroom in question, so it’s as close as you can get to walking through the woods with your own great expert.”

Ball Jars with Wide Funnel ~$20 (For 1 funnel & 1 case Ball Jars.)

“We went to the hardware store and got three cases of Ball jars and a nice big aluminum funnel and took every single item that was in a bag or an open box (including everything from tiny little pieces of pasta to crackers) and we put it in the appropriate size jar and my daughter made sticky labels and drawings for it and we filled up the pantry with this collection. It wasn’t very expensive. It didn’t take all that long. Now everything looks great and every time we open the closet we have a laugh.”

 



Bitybean Child Carrier

There are lots of infant and toddler carriers out there to suit personal preferences. What makes this carrier special — and a big reason why it’s become our everyday go-to carrier for our 22 pound six-month old — is its unbelievably compact size and simplicity.

Unlike other carriers like the Ergobaby and Babybjorn, when not in use our Bitybean carrier can be stuffed into a sack barely larger than a soft drink can. This means it can be easily slipped into a small diaper/travel bag, or even in our stroller’s cup holder. It’s there when we need it, out of the way when we don’t.

Its fast to put on (either front or back facing), very lightweight and stays cool in warm weather. While I was initially concerned about the relative lack of padding or support, our little one is quite content in it for short errands and trips to the grocery store.

We still occasionally use the Ergobaby carrier we got at our baby shower, but the Bitybean sees much more daily use.

-- Rayan Parikh  

Bitybean UltraCompact Baby Carrier
$60

Available from Amazon



Handy Paint Pail

I’m glad I don’t have to stain my cedar deck every summer but when I do I’m extra glad I found the Handy Paint Pail. It’s a quart-sized container that holds paint or stain while you do brush work. The wide, rubbery strap works two ways. Slip your hand through the adjustable strap. Your hand relaxes into a gentle curve: no cramps from hours of gripping a paint can. You can also use the handle in reverse: wear the can across the back of your hand. This leaves your hand free to grip ladders or hold things. The unique D-shaped cup is really useful. The curved part fits your hand while the flat side fits the brush.

The pail also has a very clever feature: a strong magnet molded into the inside the cup magically holds your bush up and out of the paint (and catches any drips). Clean up is a breeze — just toss away the used vacuum-formed liner (and slip in a fresh one for next time). As you can see from the photo we’ve used our HANDy Paint Pail for many years of staining and painting, inside and out.

pail-2

-- Bob Knetzger  

Handy Paint Pail
$10

Available from Amazon



Vix Bit

This might seem like a bit of a specialty tool, but for a homeowner or finish carpenter, it makes installing any kind of fixture a snap. “Vix” is a brand name for the S.E. Vick company, more generically it’s a “self-centering” drill bit, and they make a few different sizes, but I’ve only ever used the smaller one — need a bigger hole? Use it as a pilot bit. Hinges, cabinet pulls, shelf brackets, anything you need to fasten to a piece of wood, this bit prevents the tip from wandering so countersunk screws will seat perfectly. I first encountered these as a carpenter — attaching cabinet hardware is usually the last thing on the job, so you really don’t want to screw up at that stage. The vix bit makes it pretty much idiot-proof. I’ve had one for at least ten years, and it still worked great when I lost it a few weeks ago. It was sorely missed until I replaced it.

-- Chris Landers  

Set of 3 Vix Bits
$23

Available from Amazon



Ubiquiti NanoStation and Picostation

I wanted to add Internet to the building my kids’ ski race team operates out of, but the nearest point to the building we could get service was a good 400 yards away. It was not feasible to use cable.

We tried using consumer-grade product to set up a wireless bridge, with very poor results. Someone gave us a pair of Ubiquity M5 Nanos, and I can’t believe how good they performan. Once I found the tutorials, they took less than 10 minutes to set up, and about a half hour to mount (most of that time setting up my ladder). They use Power Over Ethernet (POE), so the only cable running to the device is the ethernet cable. The best part is that they are very inexpensive – $60 each from Amazon. We are only bridging 400 yards, but these devices are reported to work very well up to several kilometers, as long as you have line of sight. Speed tests showed absolutely no noticeable degradation in speed.

Since we were so happy with the first setup, I also used a PicoStation access point to broadcast wifi at the building. The range is easily 3-4 times what you will get out of a consumer grade wifi router. It takes a few minutes to set up, but the performance is so worth it.

Since then we have added bridges to two other buildings 600 meters away, and set up several outside access points to provide wifi on our training venue and to provide live timing of races.

The best part – they just work.

nano

-- David Thickens  

Ubiquiti NanoStation loco M5
$68
Ubiquiti PicoStation M2HP
$80

Available from Amazon



Boarding Area

There’s a small cottage industry of avid travelers exploiting loyalty and frequent flier programs to earn maximum free “miles.” The best moderated forum I’ve found for their tricks, tips, and hacks on how best to fly free, or almost free, is a group of bloggers called Boarding Area. They all share great stuff but I am particularly fond of Gary Leff’s blog, View from the Wing. He specializes in maximizing miles for free trips.

-- KK  

Sample Excerpts:

Here’s what I believe to be the current 10 best credit card signup bonuses on offer: 1 Chase Sapphire Preferred offers no fee the first year, 40,000 points after $3000 in spend within 3 months, no foreign currency conversion fees, double points on travel and dining, points transfers to United, Hyatt, Southwest, Amtrak, British Airways, Korean Airlines, Marriott Priority Club, and Ritz-Carlton. Probably the best all-around credit card, and with a great signup bonus. There was for a few days a similar offer with just $2000 rather than $3000 as the required spending, but that was pulled rather quickly.

*
Six tips for folks just getting started with miles and points. The basics are:

  • Start with a goal, that motivates you and also helps your choice of program. Nothing worse than finding out you want to go to French Polynesia, but United miles only let you get there flying to New Zealand first.
  • Never pass up miles, always sign up for frequent flyer programs even when it’s not your primary program. The miles add up eventually. Lots of programs become easily manageable at a site likeAwardWallet.com.