• How do you use Evernote?

    Answers Given

    Answers Favorited

  • Evernote is a great tool to do note taking and so much more. But how do you use Evernote?

    6 0
    Question by dominique dejonghe
    05/24/2011

To know what I already do with it: The Evernote Essentials eBook. Have a look here: http://goo.gl/AUb8b (affiliate link)

Answer by dominique dejonghe
05/24/2011

Some of my notebooks:

  1. Recipes: Keeping all my cooking recipes. Either by writing them down or by simply taking pictures of the cook book (OCR does the rest).

  2. Health: one independent post for each health problem. For example: "left shoulder tendonitis". And then on each post I keep a log of whatever happened related to that problem (with dates). I keep the doctors names and contacts, medicine's names and posology, links to Internet research, etc. If this happens again later I'll have all the previous experience record as a reference.

  3. Pending Documents: here I drop all pending documents, like restaurant discount vouchers, music concert tickets, receipts for VAT, etc. Everything that still needs to be taken care of.

  4. To read: Articles I collect on the net or eBooks or whatever (I use this less today because of Instapaper)

  5. My blog: here I keep a note for each pending post in my blog. For which I already had an idea but still didn't write a post.

  6. SAP Consultancy: Here I have 623 notes, one for each task I did as an SAP consultant. Everything I did for the last 11 years is registered here. And I refer to it mostly every day. It saves me hours and hours of investigation. Sometimes I refer to stuff I did in the 20th century :) It requires discipline but it really pays off.

I keep some more notebooks for specific projects, but these ones I listed above are the ones I find more interesting to share.

Nuno

Answer by nununo
05/24/2011

I find it pretty useful for wine tasting notes (nothing fancy, I just take a quick snapshot of the bottle using Evernote on Android, title it with the name/year, price, whether I would buy it again, and any overwhelming impressions). It's easy for me to search through quickly when I stop by a liquor store on my way to a BBQ and need to find a $14 Shiraz I know I like.

Answer by droppedd
05/24/2011

I am a web designer/developer and maintain an inspiration site @dsgnrsblueprint. I use evernot to bookmark sites I want to add to designersblueprint.com. I use evernote everyday, I have a terrble memory so its nice to have it on my phone,ipad, and computers.

Answer by matthewcarleton
05/24/2011

I use Evernote for a lot of things, but this year for my personal freelancing business I have begun using it to capture and store tax-related receipts . For instance, I snap a photo of a working lunch receipt on my phone (using the handy Android widget) and send it directly to my Evernote "Tax Receipts '11" folder (or forward email receipts to said folder). I use the Note subject line to classify the receipt by category. At the end of the year, I have digital copies of all my tax-related receipts, which I can sort by date, category/type, etc. Coupled with a financial services package like Quicken or Mint, this reference file will save me a ton of time getting my taxes ready and provide backup for itemized deductions.

Answer by mrgripe
05/24/2011

I use it for tracking workouts outside of normal weights or running. For example, training for Metrodash where I may do 3 rounds of farmer's walk, burpees, and box jumps. Most workout apps won't have a place for alterntaive training methods.

Answer by xavier davis
05/24/2011
« Back to Previous Page
Cool tools really work.

A cool tool can be any book, gadget, software, video, map, hardware, material, or website that is tried and true. All reviews on this site are written by readers who have actually used the tool and others like it. Items can be either old or new as long as they are wonderful. We post things we like and ignore the rest. Suggestions for tools much better than what is recommended here are always wanted.

Tell us what you love.

CATEGORIES





creative commons