Klein 10-in-1 Screwdriver

This 10-in-1 screwdriver/nut driver has a soft, cushioned grip wrapped around a hard and solid handle, making all day use no problem. And, because of its design, changing bits can be done super fast and in such way that they’re less likely to pour out.

Other 10-in1′s store the bits in a hard plastic handled push sleeve, or there’s a plastic or rubber ring around the shaft and the bits are barely secure in there, so when you screw off the end they just come out. Instead of having two, maybe three large pieces to handle, with other 10-in-1 screwdrivers you have four to six little pieces in the palm of your hand. Then you have to dump those little pieces back into the handle of the screwdriver or ‘worm’ the screwdriver in your hand to scoop up the bits.

The Klein 10-in-1 has bits like that of a ratchet driver, but it’s cheaper than both the Craftsman’s 14 bit Ratcheting Screwdriver and the Snap-On ratcheting screwdriver. The bits themselves are double-headed, and two double-headed bits are kept on what can best be described as a hex socket bit holder. Changing bits is as simple as pulling out the shaft, spinning it around and plugging it back in. To change additional bits, you pluck the bit out, then spin and click the new one back in. It takes a bit of force, but it ensures that they won’t fall out – and the pieces are all nice and large to grab.

The average home user can probably suffice with the Craftsman version of this screwdriver, but for a few dollars more the Klein quality is worth the price. I ran mine over with a 4-man scissor lift, picked it up and finished the job. Not to mention all the times it’s fallen off the ladder or the scissor lift and been fumbled and dropped. Klein tools easily last longer and when they break they can be replaced for free. Craftsman tools have the same warranty, but how many times are you willing to go back for a replacement?

-- Jordan Des Mazes  

Klein 10-in-1 Screwdriver
$14
Manufactured by Klein

Available from Amazon