Is This Thing On?

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I teach Basic Computer Skills in the local community college’s continuing education program. Last year I used the previous edition of this book, even though it was 3 years out of date, because of it’s use of simple language, humor and comprehensiveness. All my students enjoyed it and I found that it came in handy to keep me from using too much computer jargon.

This new edition includes social networking and does a nice job of updating the computer hardware and operating systems. It’s not just for seniors either. It’s for anyone interested in becoming computer literate. I have over 30 years experience and still learned a thing or two reviewing this book for my class.

-- Robert Byrd  

Is This Thing On? A Computer Handbook for Late Bloomers, Technophobes, and the Kicking & Screaming
Abby Stokes
2012, 448 pages
$11

Available from Amazon

Sample Excerpts:

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A mouse is basically a hand-operated device that controls the movement of a pointer that appears on your monitor’s screen. This pointer can appear in different shapes depending on what its function is at a given time. It can also be referred to as the arrow, mouse arrow, or cursor. (p. 12)




Discovering Statistics Using SPSS

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If you’re looking for an introduction or reference for statistical analysis, this is the one book I can recommend without reservation.

From how to quantify your research to reporting your results in various styles, this book covers it all with unmatched thoroughness, organization, and humor. Yes, humor.

I’ve owned a copy since the 3rd edition was released, and recently purchased a second so that I can have a clean copy to lend out. I believe that it’s especially helpful because it’s a statistics textbook that wasn’t written by a statistician. While it covers plenty of theory, the author originally wrote it as a reference for himself. Its intended audience is those who need to use statistics to conduct or understand research.

It also provides the best manual you can get for SPSS, the most popular statistical software for the social sciences. Andy Field doesn’t screw around when he explains how to conduct analyses in SPSS; he gets right to the point about what each function does, what each option means, and how its related to the work you need to do.

The book doesn’t just show me how to conduct analyses in SPSS, it provides an understanding of the theory involved that helps me decide whether or not a particular method is the right one to use. For methods with which I might not be familiar, Andy Field doesn’t hold your hand, but he does an excellent job getting me up to speed on the theory so that I can weigh the pros and cons of an analysis or an option myself.

It’s also extremely helpful as a quick reference if I need to remember how to properly report results or I forget what a certain type of output means for the validity of my study. It does what I believe a great textbook should do: it balances itself between being an accessible introduction to the topic and being a quick reference for those with some experience.

It’s also hilarious to read, especially if you love dirty jokes.

Note: The book comes with access to example files online that you can use to follow along with the introductory lessons for each method. I have not ever used these myself, but I have heard from an experienced stats instructor that they are the best she has seen.

-- Brandon LaRue  

Discovering Statistics Using SPSS
Andy Field, Third Edition
2009, 856 pages
$71

Available from Amazon



GoodReader

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GoodReader is a robust feature-rich PDF reader that is my killer application for the iPad. A PDF-reader sounds too simple to be a killer app until you realize that no one else has gotten it right.

I have tried reading PDFs on a PC, a Kindle, an iPhone, and, of course, printed out on paper, and every single format so far has failed miserably. The Kindle’s slow response time, small screen, and lack of effective zoom means that it can’t adapt to the various formats commonplace in PDFs (I haven’t tried the larger DX, but in talking to others the gripes remain the same). The iPhone, while adaptable in its small size, simply doesn’t have enough real estate to read PDFs effectively. Furthermore, scrolling through endless pages of PDFs on my laptops is clunky and poorly thought out, owing to the added bulk of a laptop or desktop, and the horizontal nature of the screen.

I am relieved that my struggle with reading PDFs has been solved by GoodReader. The iPad’s versatile vertical and horizontal format makes for easy reading, while the ability to flip through pages with touch eliminates any of the awkwardness of the Kindle or PC. GoodReader also uses tabs for quick switching between PDFs, a feature that I believe neither OSX Preview or Acrobat has really gotten right.

Outside of reading and reviewing, GoodReader takes advantage of the iPad’s touch input by allowing for easy highlighting, text input, and drawing. Marking up PDFs on an iPad, while not professional-caliber, far exceeds the day-to-day utility of something like Adobe Acrobat Professional, while matching all the benefits of good old pen-and-paper without the associated reams and reams of paper.

Another problem GoodReader resolves is the management of PDFs. Having a dedicated, easy to access management system means I don’t have to search through thousands of files on my laptop. The layout makes it easy to organize PDFs into folders, but the killer feature is the ability to sync GoodReader to DropBox or other servers. Now, when I edit or mark up a PDF I can easily save it and access that copy from anywhere without the hassle of email, or manual syncing.

It seems strange that a PDF-reader would become the killer application on the iPad, but it also makes sense. When it was first released, the iPad was a curiosity; a blank slate without a specific use. As it has matured, the flexibility and familiarity of touch-input plus paper sized high-res screen and long battery life has created an almost-perfect format for working with PDFs. And GoodReader is the application that has made it happen.

-- Oliver Hulland  

GoodReader
$5

Available from iTunes



Grades App

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When I went back to college, I found one of the hardest things to deal with was trying to figure out where my grade stood in any particular class. Did the professor do weighted grades? Point system? What score did I get on that last test? Did I calculate in that extra credit? Is the score written on my test and the one in the professor’s grade book the same?

Before I found Grades, I tried the two other student organizer apps on the Android Market. One was only really good at keeping track of my attendance and my overall GPA, the other ended up being useless to me because it could only handle weighted (each category is a percent of the grade) scoring. While the developer was nice enough, he/she didn’t understand that I needed it to be point based (earned / total points = % score).

In a last ditch effort, I did another search and found a new app was added to the Market called Grades: Student Organizer. That was almost 2 semesters and a summer intersession ago and I haven’t looked back!

Grades is able to calculate the student’s GPA, how many units have been taken, grade in each class, and can customize each class individually in either weighted or point-based grading systems.

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Their customer service is wonderful, too. I’ve emailed them several times with problems and suggestions to add to the app and each time I’ve gotten a response usually within a day and even a few of my suggestions were included in the following release (though I suppose that’s more of a Great Minds Think Alike thing).

At the time, I had tried literally every other student gradebook application out there on the Android Market and this one did everything I needed and in the end had everything else the other applications offered. At only $0.99, it’s also the cheapest.

-- Nyx Goldstone  

Grades: Student Organizer
Android application
$1

Available from Android Market Produced by Android Infinity



Three Great Anatomy Books

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The Anatomical Chart Series by Peter Bachin and Ernest Beck is a flip-page guide that includes excellent anatomical charts. It appears to be out-of-print but you can find it used.

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The Human Body by Ruth & Bertel Bruun is a great and colorful children’s anatomy book. You can find it used for around $3.

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Of my maybe dozen books on anatomy (always fascinated by what Dr. Henry Bieler author of Food Is Your Best Medicine calls “the magnificent human body”), this is the masterpiece: Atlas of Human Anatomy by Frank Netter.

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How any one human could do all these exquisite drawings in a lifetime is beyond me. The drawings of the hand are spectacular. There is no descriptive text, so I don’t know if this is the perfect text for helping with self-diagnosis, but this is a reference book anyone interested in the human body should have.

I have an older 4th edition, but they recently released the 5th.

My doctor was using a Grey’s Anatomy, and I sent him a copy of this and he was mightily pleased.

-- Lloyd Kahn  

[Note: You can find Netter's Anatomy in various forms including an iPhone and iPod touch application for those on the go.-- OH]

The Anatomical Chart Series
Peter Bachin and Ernest Beck
Classic Library Edition
$25 (used)
Available used at Amazon

The Human Body Ruth and Bertel Bruun
96 pages
$60
Available used at Abe Books

Atlas of Human Anatomy, Fifth edition
Frank Netter
624 pages
$66
Available from Amazon



Sage Maths

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Sage Maths is free open source software for doing virtually every type of maths you can imagine. Not just numerical maths, but symbolic maths too – you can give Sage an equation and it will tell you what the equation of its integral or differential is, for example. And it will do numerical maths, plot graphs, analyze statistical information and solve equations or sets of equations. In fact, it will do virtually anything mathematical you can think of.

Sage was developed as an open source alternative to commercial systems like Mathematica and Matlab (it has most but not all of the functionality of both) because mathematicians and scientists need to be able to understand and review the algorithms their software uses – something not possible with a closed system.

Originally developed for graduate mathematicians, Sage is now at the stage where it is useful and interesting to professional and hobbyist mechanical and electronic engineers, amateur astronomers, business number crunchers, and people who just want to know more maths than they do. It runs on Linux, Windows and OS X, and lately people have managed to run it on both Apple iThings and Android smartphones.

-- Jonathan Coupe  

Sage Maths
Free

Available from Sage



The 10% Solution

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I have been using this slim book as an editing tool for several years. By using a global word search on a couple dozen words, and reducing their occurrence in your writing, you can shorten the length of a piece of writing by 10% (or more). I’ve used it and it works extremely well. This is a tool useful to both professional and novice writers.

I have copied the list of words into a text file, which I printed out in a long, thin column and taped to the side of my monitor. Whenever I finish a story, I run the searches and tighten up the text. It helps you find and eliminate passive voice, evasive, wishy-washy prose, and general wordiness.

Like a thesaurus, it must be used with care and attention to the overall impact on your writing. That said, I highly recommend The 10% Solution as a quick and dirty editing tool to help you “write tight”.

-- Amy Thomson  

The 10% Solution
First Edition
Ken Rand
1998, 63 pages
$11

Available from Amazon



Anatomy Trains

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Anatomy Trains is a map of our musculoskeletal anatomy. It’s intended for hands-on and movement bodyworkers but is a great read for anyone interested in structure, whole-systems thinking, and brilliant design. I realized after doing Pilates for a while that I had no idea about anatomical structure and why Pilates was effective. While advocating no particular body/mind discipline, Anatomy Trains allowed me to understand why Pilates works. That was eight years ago; my understanding continues to expand over time.

Author Tom Myers asks a grand question: what would happen if we take a different cut at understanding the muscles and tendons? Instead of cutting against the grain at the ends, what happens when you follow the grain past the individual muscles and tendons and see how long the lines of tension go? Tom creates a set of rules and then starts mapping.

An anatomy expert could research and apply those rules themselves; I just followed along. The results are pretty cool: a map of about a dozen or so long lines of tension in our bodies. Most of them are longer than we are tall; some are almost twice as long. Some lines are roughly linear and some spiral around our torso and leg bones. Some lines are near the skin while some are next to the bones. Tom created a new term for these lines: myofascial meridians. Nobody has ever done this before, but the lines are real: Myers has gone into the lab multiple times with teams of students to dissect these long lines of tension in cadavers.

Myers studied under two remarkable body/mind instructors: Moshe Feldenkrais and Ida Rolf. He also studied under Buckminster Fuller, the great whole-systems engineer of the 20th century. The first chapter of the book, The World According to Fascia, provides a lot of background information for the mappings in the remainder of the book. Myers notes that there are three fractal/pervasive networks in our body: circulatory/chemical, nervous/electrical, and structural/spatial. He notes the elusiveness of the structural network: while we’ve had clear models of the first two for hundreds of years, our fine-grained structural network is still quite elusive. This is whole-systems thinking at its finest: lots of ideas how natural tech connects from the nano-scale to full-size human beings.

Like the great science book Godel, Escher, Bach: An Eternal Golden Braid, this book can be read at many different levels. The first way is just to look at the maps and the supporting drawings and charts. A second way is to read the various side discussions and notes. A third way is to plough straight through the rather dense text. I’ve never read AT from cover to cover, but I’ve gone through most of it and read almost all of the side discussions.

My one criticism of the book: its full title, Anatomy Trains: Myofascial Meridians for Manual and Movement Therapists, is enough to scare off those not in the industry. It is a wonderful and friendly book, but books like this must have a formidable title to be sold to medical/health professionals. The ideas it discusses are right on the edge of our understanding of biological systems, but there is not a milligram of woo-woo.

-- Phil Earnhardt  

[For those interested, here is a link to a 20-page read-only PDF that provides an overview of much of what is included in the book.--OH]

Anatomy Trains
Second edition
Thomas W. Myers
2008, 440 pages
$56

Available from Amazon

Sample Excerpts:

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*
Humans are not assembled out of parts like a car or a computer. “Body as machine’ is a useful metaphor, but like any poetic trope, it does not tell the whole story. In our modern perception of human movement anatomy, however, we are in danger of making this metaphor into the be all and end all. In actual fact, our bodies are conceived as a whole, and grow, live, and die as a whole- but our mind is a knife.

*

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Tensegrity structures, when stressed, tend to distribute rather than concentrate strain. The body does the same with the result that local injuries soon become global strain patterns.




SelfControl

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Hours can fly by in the blink of an eye when I am surfing the web. In an effort to regain some footing in this battle against distraction I have recently been using a program called SelfControl. This free Mac-only open-source program (there are PC and Linux based alternatives) clamps down on internet usage by selectively turning it off.

SelfControl uses brute force to stop bad online habits. When the timer-based program is activated browsers will act like they aren’t connected to the internet. You can restart your computer, you can quit the program, you can switch browsers, and you can even uninstall the program (be careful, because if you are too invasive you can permanently damage some systems). It doesn’t matter. You are locked out for the allotted amount of time. As such you have to be careful with how you use it. You don’t want to accidentally lock yourself out of the web for 12 hours if you know you have to research an important subject that evening.

Unlike other programs like Freedom which only serve to ban all internet access for a designated amount of time, SelfControl gives you more control over what you want to keep on and off. You can use a “white list” of approved sites or a “black list” of banned ones. Or, you can selectively set it up to block things like twitter and email. This selectivity is crucial in that it allows you to tame but not break the internet.

I personally prefer to use a “black list”. By eradicating access to well known time sinks during working hours I reduce the temptation to stray while keeping open the rest of the web for research (especially important as I work from home and primarily online).

I wish I didn’t need a program like SelfControl. But given my inability to resist sites like Wikipedia, I am happy to know I can, at times, selectively curb my internet usage.

-- Oliver Hulland  

[Note: It has recently been ported to Linux, but is reportedly buggy. You can download it here.--OH]

SelfControl
Mac OSX
Free

Produced by Steve Lambert



Quick Snap Ice Tray

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These ice trays aren’t glamorous or costly, but they do the job. Below each cube’s compartment is a button that releases the cube. The trays are very easy to use. My husband has very little hand strength. As such, we’ve tried aluminum, plastic and several other different ice trays. These are the only ones he has been able to use in several years.

-- Laurie Gelb  

Joseph Joseph Quick Snap Ice Tray
$8

Available from Amazon

Manufactured by Joseph Joseph