Cuturi Air Hammers

I am a figurative marble sculptor. I have been using the Cuturi air hammer line for 20 years. I learned about it from the 70-year-old artisani in Italy who have been sculpting for major studios all their lives.* They use Cuturi because they stand up to 40 hour weeks, for decades. So, that’s what I got. I have tried some others, and they worked OK, but nothing was better and it has withstood the test of time since I have been using mine for a long time.

Cuturi air hammers come in different sizes (different size pistons) and two types. The roughing hammers take larger chisels shaft diameters. The finish hammers take smaller chisel shaft diameters. Depending on your needs, you will probably want a large, medium, and small hammer for roughing, and then a medium and small for finish work. If you don’t use a diamond bladed saw for the initial stage of the rough (getting rid of big chunks of stone), you may want the largest air hammer for your initial rough but it’s very heavy and exhausting to use.

Generally, I use carbide tipped chisels which can be purchased commercially. However, for finish work, the last two finishing stages are done with chisels made by a blacksmith out of steel. (The retired Italian blacksmith who made my set of steels complained that he has a hard time finding quality steel for chisels anymore.) The carbides are sharpened on a grinder. The steels are sharpened on a stone. (Nothing fancy, a nearby flat rock will do.) The roughing Cuturi hammers are best with carbide chisels. The larger finishing hammer can use both. The smaller finishing hammer is only used with steel.

You can see examples of my work.

sculpture

*Sadly, when you buy a marble sculpture by a famous artist, it is not unlikely that they have never touched the stone. They send a model to one of the major studios in Pietrasanta, Italy and the artisani there copy the model into stone, often enlarging it and adding important details. Sometimes they just get a hand sketch or a short description to work from. They get paid a fairly low hourly wage, then the sculpture gets crated by a guy who has been doing it all his life, shipped to a New York gallery, and someone pays six figures for it.

-- Chuck Clanton  

Cuturi Air Hammers
Prices vary



Breville One-Touch Tea Maker

It is amazing how different the same tea tastes when you have the ability to consistently experiment with the brewing temperature and steeping time. Different teas require different brewing temps and steeping times to bring out the best flavor. I like green tea. The Breville allows you to set the temperature by degrees and the steeping time. Do you like strong tea? Set it to steep longer. Once you set it, it is all automatic. No more waiting for your tea to cool from boiling to drink it. Would like another cup of tea? The Breville will keep the tea at your set temp for 60 minutes.

Yes, this appliance is expensive. However, after using it nearly each day since November 2010, it is totally worth the money, and remains one of my favorite purchases and is very reliable. I’ve had zero problems with it. Breville makes great appliances, and they are very well made, with excellent customer support.

-- Kevin Lindsay  

Breville One-Touch Tea Maker
$250

Available from Amazon



 

Bestselling Author and Entrepreneur, Seth Godin [Cool Tools Show #13]

Subscribe to the Cool Tools Podcast on iTunes | RSS | Transcript | Download MP3 |See all the Cool Tools Show posts on a single page

Seth Godin enlightens us this week with an unexpected assortment of tools that will have you exploring the deepest recesses of your subconscious while, at the same time, enriching your hobbies and lifestyle.

Show Notes:

Strikingly Free or Subscription

“I started using this tool and it turns out it’s a simple bounded web development tool that is all plug and play. It only lets you build a one page website, but it’s hard for me to imagine a website being ten times more beautiful than what you can build with Strikingly…”

 

Wired Magazine Entire Collection

“…every once in a while I’ll take down an issue. This is the behemoth issue from December 1999. It is more than four hundred and fifteen pages long and what’s fascinating about it is the combination of breathless enthusiasm combined with sometimes not particularly long-lasting technology and what I find useful about that is it helps to not take myself so damn seriously…”

 

One Lucky Duck

“Sometimes I would drive twenty miles out of my way to get a single brownie and then drive home and I’m sure there’s no biochemical reason why it makes me feel taller, better, faster and able to jump and run higher, but it does and it’s been interesting to sort of hack my own mental physical barrier…”

Penguin Magic

“I think it’s a great site to go to because the way the site works is every single trick is demonstrated in a high production value video so it’s basically a magic show you can watch whenever you want to and the only way to find out how it’s done is to buy it.”

 



Caframo Ecofan Airmax Heat Powered Stove Fan

This woodstove fan has greatly increased the comfort level of my home. Our primary heat source is a wood stove insert. Prior to the use of this fan the stove would only heat the immediate area around the fireplace and the upstairs. Now the entire lower floor is much warmer. The coolest thing about this tool is that it uses “thermoelectric technology to convert a temperature difference into electricity.” It’s the same technology as the recently reviewed Biolite Camp Stove.

-- Peter Ratner  

Caframo Ecofan Airmax Heat Powered Stove Fan
$127

Available from Amazon



Grease Monkey Gorilla Grip Gloves

I ran across these gloves when I did a bathroom remodel around 2 years ago. Basically, they are a thin synthetic knit glove that has a palm and fingertip area that’s coated in a “polymer.” Traditionally, I’ve worn those cheap rubber dipped gloves when working with tile, but these gloves are far superior. The best part of these gloves is that they are really thin and allow for all the manual dexterity that you would have in a nitrile glove, but the Gorilla Grip gloves are much more durable. They’re great for wet work because they let the back of your hand breathe and dry out.

When I did tile work with them, they were really great for using with the wet tile saw. Even though they were wet, they didn’t slide around, get soggy, or come apart – even when soaked in water. I’ve used them as a go to general purpose glove for most home improvements. Just this past week, I used them on a drop ceiling project and an attic insulation project. They were great in that they protected my hands from the ceiling tiles and insulation while allowing me to switch tools and do fine motor tasks while wearing the gloves.

These gloves are the perfect medium between a disposable rubber or nitrile glove and a heavier work glove while being better than other rubber/vinyl dipped gloves.

-- Chuck Balog  

Grease Monkey Gorilla Grip Gloves
$9

Available from Amazon



X-Stand Portable Notebook Cooling Stand

I’ve used this laptop stand for six years after discovering it branded and sold by Targus (where it can no longer be found). After losing mine, I found it again branded under “Hercules XStand Portable Notebook Cooling Stand” and “Opteka X-Stand Ergonomic Portable Airflow Cooling Stand.”

The stand is beautifully built, light (all-aluminum structure), and well-designed. It’s for 15″ – 17″ laptops, and easily folds down to something you could slip into a pocket. The stand tilts the keyboard a few degrees, which is nice, but its primary use is to allow plenty of airflow under the computer for cooling; I find it substantially reduces the temperature, which is not only nice for me, it certainly helps lengthen the life of my laptops. It has to be used on a flat surface – not your lap. I use it everywhere.

The stand is far-and-away the smallest and lightest laptop stand I’ve ever seen, and retails online for anywhere from $15 to $23.

-- Barry Schwartz  

X-Stand Portable Notebook Cooling Stand
$23

Available from Amazon



EGear 30-Day Lantern

I have used this one for over a year. My grandmother was thrilled to have a couple during an extended power outage last year. When we got power back we passed the lanterns on to her friends until they had power restored. We never changed the batteries and neither did they. My grandmother gave one to all her friends last Christmas — best received gift ever. One of the best features is that it is actually bright enough to be useful. I love the hook on the bottom that lets me hang it from a fixture or pipe. (There was a huge battery shortage before, during and after the storm so now I keep a set of rechargeable batteries on hand for them.)

-- Tim Stone  

eGear 30-day lantern
$40

Available from Amazon



Chestnut Tools Hanging Scale

Many of the things I want to weigh are odd shapes and sizes. I can use rope, string, wire, etc. suspended almost anything from this digital-readout scale. I can weigh a fish by putting the hook between the lure and the fish. I have used this thing for about four years. It’s vastly superior to the Zebco De-Liar Fish Scale I have in my tackle box.

-- Scott Morgan  

Chestnut Tools Portable Electronic Scale
$13



Torin Aluminum Work Platform

I have used this tool for years, most recently in a whole-house renovation. It allows you to reach high places around the house without a ladder and with more flexibility than a simple stool or step ladder. This tool is specifically great for painting high trim like crown molding and ceiling lines. The platform is textured and provides stability, even when reaching into high corners. It also folds flat for compact storage. I couldn’t imagine painting any room without this miniature scaffold.

-- Sarah Akers  

Torin T55044 Aluminum Work Platform
$61

Available from Amazon



What’s in My Bag, Stephanie Moore

I work part-time at the local community college tutoring math and science. I have also been known to suit-up and play paintball (usually the lone female and oldest player on the field), so my bag contains a rather odd variety of things.

duluth

I recently had to upgrade from my dearly loved Maxpedition FR-1 pouch simply because it lacked the storage space I needed. After months of research and debating with myself, about a month ago I purchased a Duluth Trading Company Firehose & Leather Field Bag ($90).

Looking at it from the outside, the bag has 3 large zippered compartments and the 2 outer sides have a smaller flat zippered compartment and one that is open with a loop of leather and snap to keep it semi-closed.

So what do I carry?

The open outer compartment carries my iPhone 4s and sometimes a USB to iPhone cable so I can recharge off a computer or in the car.

kleenexThe zippered outer compartment carries my wallet and a small pack of Kleenex because in my family there is a Kleenex box or two in every room!

baginnards

The full-size zip compartment next to the open outer compartment is gusseted – an extremely nice feature that allows both easy access and cramming a lot of things in! The inside of this compartment has 2 graduated open storage slots, a flat zippered storage slot, and a pen/pencil etc holder on one side and the other side has a large open storage area. Counting the main storage area, that makes 6 places to divide up things! I recently discovered a way to “fix” the divider being too flexible. I simply put in a small notepad (like a 6×9 Moleskine, only a cheap version) and voila! I have writing paper *and* a stiffer divider!

ruler

In the pen/pencil area I carry a 6-inch yellow see-through ruler marked in both centimeters and inches (yellow because it makes print easier to read for students with nystagmus, and marking the line being read helps students with dyslexia and/or ADHD), 2 different colors each of highlighters, Sharpie markers and ballpoint pens and 2 or more Papermate clearpoint elite mechanical pencils ($10 for 2) (the “elite” part nets you the metal clip which you can hang on a spiral notebook without having it break mid-term). These particular pencils have been my favorite for years now because the side-advance means you don’t advance the lead every time you erase and because the erasers are so long they last forever even when you make a lot of mistakes. Although they are sold in solid colors, my son took the pencils apart and mixed the barrel colors for me so my students (many of whom use the same pencils due to my influence) never inadvertently leave with *my* pencils.

tape

In one open slot I carry a roll of tape (useful for sticking reminder notes in places without marker boards), a small metal tape measure (extremely useful when out shopping for furnishings), and a small note pad.

tins

In one of the larger open slots I carry 3 Altoids tins in green, red and teal. The teal one is empty while I am figuring out what might need to go in it, but the other day I was shopping and had to take some medicine so I used the clean empty tin as an emergency drinking cup. I believe it will stay empty now!

redtin

The red tin is my “first aid/survival” tin. It contains my Leatherman Squirt PS4 ($28) (with pliers/wire cutters, essential for emergency string changes on my electric bass), 2 bandaids, a couple rubber bands and paper clips (unbent paperclips can be very handy for unlocking doors), Uncle Bill’s Sliver Gripper tweezers ($7), a nail clipper and file and a lighter (I don’t smoke, but it’s been great for lighting candles, sealing the ends of cut paracord etc), two small screen cleaning cloths and a couple of foreign coins I found while geo-caching.

greentin

The green tin is more school stuff, various page marking sticky papers, extra pencil leads and a couple of large erasers.

knife-1

knife-2

Attached to the zipper of this compartment is a little clip to which I attach my Tool Logic SLP2 knife ($30). This knife is relatively lightweight, sharp, and has a magnesium fire starter, an LED flashlight and a piercing emergency whistle built into it. Love my knife! Attaching it this way allows me to find it without digging thru the depths of my bag and to unclip it easily. The short length of orange cord remains on the knife allowing me to easily find it without getting in the way of using it.

toiletry

The large center zippered pocket is the only large pocket without gussets, but it is the widest one. I use this as my toiletry kit. Like the previous pocket, it has interior organizational pockets (Three of them, all open and all on one side). Here I keep an inhaler, nasal spray, a divided box of various meds, hand lotion, a brush and comb, lip balm, disposable toothpicks, a metal tooth cleaner, and, since I made myself extremely nauseous taking two prescription tablets that looked like ibuprofen from my divided pill container, a small Altoids tin dedicated to ibuprofen tablets. If needed, I also carry a prescription bottle of short-term medicine I may be taking.

dice-1

dice-2

The final zippered compartment is gusseted and is one large area. Here I keep a smaller (yellow) zippered bag that holds my pStyle female urination device ($12) (for dirty restrooms and paintball fields), another pack of Kleenex, a zip pouch of polyhedral dice (just because I like math and they are pretty), a snap-close pouch of earbuds with all the various sizes of foamy parts that go on them and some ear plugs to retain my sensitive hearing and avoid migraines in loud places.

strap

Lastly, there is the bag’s padded shoulder strap. More than one person has commented it looks like a, well, a not-very-comfortable shoulder strap. I am quick to assure them, that however it looks and whatever it is made of, it is hands-down the most comfortable shoulder strap I’ve ever worn (and I have lots of experience with bad ones from 40+ years of guitar and bass straps holding up instruments that weigh between 5 and 20 lbs).

case

Clipped onto the shoulder strap is a glasses case for my sunglasses (which I wear year-round because my eyes are light sensitive).

That about covers it and the bag isn’t even all the way filled up! I’ve shown it to some female friends (outdoorsy biology instructors and an ER nurse) and without my junk in it, the bag is quite capable of carrying a Kindle or smaller iPad plus a 6×9” size book plus a 6×9” notebook or journal with room for other things.

-- Stephanie Moore  

[Cool Tools Readers! We will pay you $100 if we run your "What's in My Bag" story. Send photos of the things in your bag (and of the bag itself, if you love it), along with a description of the items and why they are useful. Make sure the photos are large (1200 pixels wide, at least) and clear. Use a free file sharing service like Bitcasa to upload the photos, and email the text to editor@cool-tools.org. See all of our What's in my Bag? posts. -- Mark Frauenfelder]