Kitchen

RSVP Potato Ricer

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The potato masher's creed

This is my potato ricer ($16). There are many potato ricers, but this one is mine (there are really quite a few to choose from, but this one is both inexpensive and works well).

It is my life. Without me my potato ricer is useless. Without my potato ricer, I cannot make super fluffy, delicious mashed potatoes. I must not fill my potato ricer too full, lest potato squish out the sides. I must wait until the potato has cooled so it does not burn my fingers. I will.

My potato ricer and I know that what counts in making mashed potatoes is to not overwork the potatoes so they become a gluey mass, to not expend too much effort squishing them with a traditional potato masher so that one’s energy is completely spent. We know that it’s the gentle squeezing of the potato through the potato ricer that makes the best mashed potatoes. We will squeeze.

My potato ricer is human, even as I am human, because it is my life. Thus, I will learn it as a cool tool. I have learned its weaknesses (squishing out potatoes on the sides if it is filled too full; hard to squeeze if the potatoes are underdone), its strengths (easily and quickly making silky, smooth, fluffy mashed potatoes; useful for squeezing liquid out of spinach, zucchini, and grated potatoes), its parts (it’s basically a giant plastic garlic press), and its accessories (two metal plates with different hole sizes).

I will keep my potato ricer clean and ready (it’s dishwasher safe) even as I am clean and ready. We will become part of each other. My potato ricer and I are the defenders of decent mashed potatoes. We are the masters of the kitchen. We are the saviors of dinner. So be it, until mashed potatoes are all eaten and there is no more gravy.

-- Abbie Stillie 12/13/18