Recomendo

Favorite newsletters/Untools.co/Back scratcher

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Recomendo: issue no. 269

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My favorite newsletters
In a recent issue of my newsletter, The Magnet, I listed my 10 favorite newsletters. You can read about them here. — MF

Problem-solving tools
If you find yourself stuck, Untools.co is a collection of thinking tools to help you solve problems and make decisions. They were put together by a product designer who gets paid to problem solve but couldn’t find one place on the internet where tools like these were housed, so he created one. He does a great job of breaking these frameworks down with an outline and visuals. If you’re stuck but not sure where to start, here are some prompt questions to direct you. — CD

Back Scratcher
I don’t know how people live without a back scratcher. I keep one near my desk. The pleasure of  an itch scratched is incomparable. Mine is bamboo, the perfect reach, and lasts forever. I can’t imagine why you might need five, but they are cheap, too. — KK

Easy-to-read tape measure
The Komelon Speed Mark Gripper Measuring Tape (1-Inch X 25Ft) has two things going for it that my other tape measure doesn’t. The markings are easy to read and I can extend the metal tape out eight feet before it bends. It’s also less expensive than I would expect for such a nice tape measure. — MF

Customize your own journal
I used to hand-bind my own journals using repurposed fabric, books, paper, etc. When I write in journals I make myself, my writing is imbued with wonder and magic. Unfortunately, I haven’t made time to do that lately, but I did discover that through Papier you can customize your own hardcover or paperback notebooks with your name, a quote or whatever words inspires you. I chose their Soleia print and customized it with my name and a quote from a dream I had — but they have so many beautiful designs to choose from. If you do want to check it out, here is a link that gives you and me both $10 off. — CD

Modern farming series
Jeremy Clarkson is a larger-than-life British TV celebrity. He writes bombastic newspaper columns, hosts game shows, and for decades has been the star of automobile stunt shows such as Top Gear and Grand Auto. Recently he retired to his 1,000-acre farm in England, which he is trying to farm himself. Naturally, he’s made a reality-tv show about it. Clarkson’s Farm streams on Amazon, and despite being a scripted reality-tv show, I have been bingeing the 8-part first season because it offers a deep and detailed examination of what modern farming is all about. Hint: there are a lot of machines and gear involved. Clarkson’s Farm is entertaining because it is all about showing off how ignorant Clarkson is, how he keeps screwing up, losing money, getting in his own way, having to learn from locals much more experienced, and how complex modern farming life is. The show is good. — KK

-- Kevin Kelly, Mark Frauenfelder, Claudia Dawson 09/12/21